PRESS RELEASE: Co-owner of Muskoka Brewery Takes ownership of Vancouver Island Brewery

 

VIBCORPTRANSPARENCYthumbYesterday, The president of  Vancouver Island Brewery Barry Fisher announced that he is passing the torch to new ownership and new leadership. Why is this relevent to us here in Ontario you ask? Well effective yesterday , Barry formally entrusts the ownership of Vancouver Island Brewery to Bob MacDonald, co-owner of Muskoka Brewery. As well, Barry announced that Tim Barnes will come on board as President.

We don’t often hear about one craft brewery owner taking control of another craft brewery but with the growth of Muskoka Brewery it is not a surprising move.

For the the full Press Release see below.


Media Release – June 15, 2016

To Vancouver Island Brewery fans and Canada’s local beer community, 

As you all know, I love Vancouver Island Brewery and we have been proud to serve premium quality craft brewed beers to the loyal communities of British Columbia for more than thirty years. Well, now, after all these years it is time to move on and pass the torch to a successor who will carry on the quality beer legacy that Vancouver Island Brewery has accomplished.

My old friend Gary McMullen, CEO and founder of Muskoka Brewery, introduced me to his partner and co-owner, Bob MacDonald. I first met Bob in January of 2015 and as I got to know him better I realized that Bob was passionate about the beer industry and his and my values were very similar.

Over the years, I have followed the growth of Muskoka Brewery with great interest as one does when he knows the founder. Like many craft brewers, Gary started Muskoka to live out his passion for beer; however, as the business grew, so did the need for financial resources for expansion. Gary was introduced to Bob as a potential investor. Seeing that Bob was committed to a long term vision, the two became partners in building Muskoka into the successful brewery that it is today.

Effective today, I formally entrust the ownership of Vancouver Island Brewery to Bob MacDonald. True to Bob’s ownership and management style, all operations and decision-making will remain on Vancouver Island and the brewery will continue to operate independently. I am certain that Bob’s long-term vision and orientation to investing for growth in the business will be welcome news to our long time loyal employees, many who have been with the brewery for twenty to thirty years – these are the people who built Vancouver Island Brewery.

To ensure the future growth and success of the brewery, Bob felt it was important to find a strong leader with a demonstrated track record, someone with similar values and roots in the beer community. I am pleased to announce that Tim Barnes will be the new President of Vancouver Island Brewery.

I have a great deal of respect for Tim and I believe he has the vision and experience necessary to lead Vancouver Island Brewery through this next chapter. Most importantly, I know that Tim shares Vancouver Island’s values and will uphold our commitment to our employees and our community.

In Bob and Tim’s hands, the brewery will now have the strong leadership it needs to go to the next level of producing award winning craft brewed beers.

Sincerely,

Barry Fisher

Muskoka Brewery to withdraw from 3 Western Provinces

Looks like government is to blame for Muskoka Brewery withdrawing their beer from “New West Partnership” provinces, Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Many Canadian independent brewers were shocked on October 29th, when the Alberta government made the decision to increase the tax rate for craft brewers outside the New West Partnership. Muskoka was forced to wind down operations as a direct relation to the tax increased, causing the brewery to remove their beer from those provinces by the end of 2015. According to Muskoka, the brewery was faced with a mark-up rate of 145% which equals $74/HL or $1.51 per 6 pack.

“We have remarkable customer support and sales momentum in these markets,” says Gary McMullen, president and founder of Muskoka Brewery. “Up until this new legislation was announced, we had no intention of leaving. In fact, we had plans to widen our footprint based on the growing demand for our beers. We’re sorry to leave our friends and supporters, but with this new tax increase it’s now unsustainable to sell our beer in these provinces.”

As one of the leaders in the Canadian craft beer industry for almost 20 years, the brewery is committed to continue to grow the craft beer industry within Canada despite the rules and regulations of the governments. McMullen says “We can’t allow this setback to divide the Canadian craft brewing community. We’d like to sincerely thank our customers for their support and passion for us, and we’ll be back when these trade barriers are squashed.”

Muskoka Brewery looks to be keeping true to growth of their beer with plans of expanding closer to home (Ontario), including the U.S. market and Quebec.

The West Gone Wild, For Sour Beers

Sours

The West Gone Wild, For Sour Beers Out in beautiful British Columbia, we have amazing outdoor activities in the wild and a rocking beer culture, evident by the 30% share of awards BC took at the 2015 Canadian Brewing Awards. The craft beer industry has really taken off here, doubling the amount of breweries in the last two and a half years with no sign of slowing down. What’s most interesting about this growth is that most new places aren’t opening up with just a basic line-up, rather it’s become almost a standard to open with a barrel aging and sour program from the get go. We’ve experienced a rapid rise of sour beers in the BC craft beer market thanks to some early success and a few hard core brewers who’ve been doing it for years and of course a tight knit beer community.

Now sour beers are new to some folks, but they’ve been around forever in Europe, including some styles like a Polish Gratzer which has been recently revived in North America thanks to creativity and the need to be different. There are many ways to sour a beer, some are quicker than others, but essentially it involves introducing some form of bacteria or wild yeast into the beer and letting it go to work. It often takes many months or years before a sour beer is ready to drink. Beer can be soured during the brewing process with Lactobacillus, it can be soured in barrels by spontaneous fermentation from wild yeasts, or the brewer can add a wild yeast type like Saccharomyces or Brettanomyces to give the beer some funky notes among other unique souring methods. What likely started out as an oops, has long since become a meticulous brewing process that can produce some amazing flavours in craft beer.

Out West, we’ve been privy to a huge influx of soured beers this year.  I can think of over 30 breweries that have released a sour type beer on the market in the past month or two, typically to a lot of fanfare and excitement. Some places are even releasing them within their first year or so of operation. They typically brew the beer soon after opening and let it sit for 9-12 months to let it develop in a barrel. Others are kettle souring beers and putting them out on the market regularly in limited releases or in some cases have built long term souring and blending programs to keep a consistent sour on tap and in the market. Honestly, it’s been crazy to watch as we have more sour beers on the market than double IPA’s in BC, a style ratio that’s quite rare for the rest of North America where double IPA’s are worshipped like gods and celebrities.

This is standard family summer BBQ beer in BC, also a Gold Medal winner at the CBA’s
This is standard family summer BBQ beer in BC, also a Gold Medal winner at the CBA’s

Sour beers aren’t new to BC brewing, Yaletown and Storm Brewing have brewed sour beers forever and Driftwood brewery, who is famous for Fat Tug IPA, has been releasing them since they opened. However, they’ve been part of a fairly niche market until 2015 where you can’t go into a liquor store now without seeing at least a solid selection of sour beer. Clearly the population out this way has adventurous palates and desire to try new things and the brewers are happy to oblige, encouraged by the evolution of the craft beer community in British Columbia.

To give a few examples, sour beers like Four Winds Nectarous (which is a dry hopped sour ale that will blow your mind) are here to stay and are actually becoming hard to get because of demand. More breweries are dreaming up new ways to entice the market into trying a sour beer, like Dageraad Brewing’s Passion Fruit De Witte Sour Ale, a citrusy sour special release that was so popular they were compelled to brew it again for a second summer release. Parallel finally released Lil Red Redemption, a third year anniversary special release as a comeback from their first sour nightmare (hey, they don’t all go so well, sours aren’t easy to make). Finally, breweries are even releasing Gose beers, one of the more ‘out there’ sour styles I can think of, often tasting like sweaty tart lemonade but pairs great with sushi just to stay relevant. I can’t recall other markets that have embraced this style of beer so quickly.

British Columbian beer drinkers have gotten a taste of the sour bugs (literally, those are bacteria after all) and we aren’t going to back away from them anytime soon. Even some of the insanely mouth furrowing sour Cascade Brewing beers are on the liquor store shelves now, each Cantillon release flies off the shelves before you can blink and the importers are clearly reacting to the market accordingly by bringing in more sour styles to choose from. Be it a mild Berliner Weise, a sour Red Lager, a Brett IPA, a Sour Wheat Ale from a Belgian trained brewer in Powell River or an Imperial Flanders Red from the weirdest brewery in town, if you’re looking for a sour beer experience there’s never been a better time out West than now to get it. We are wild for beer, and even wilder for sour ales! In British Columbia we are ready to pucker up for even more, cheers!

Jumpin Jack (Tree Brewing Co.)

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Origin: Kelowna, B.C, Canada

Beer Style: Pumpkin Ale

Alc./Vol.: 6.5%

IBU: 65

Malts: Pale, Chocolate, Crystal, Light Munich, Dark Munich

Hops: Perle, Golding, Tettnang

Suggested Glassware: Pokal

Suggested Serving Temperature: 3-5° Celsius

Availability: Seasonal (Fall)

Where to buy: LCBO and Tree Brewing Co.

This weeks beer review features a beer from Tree Brewing Co. in Kelowna, B.C. This is my second beer from this BC brewery. This time I will be reviewing Jumpin Jack, which is a India Pumpkin Ale. Jumpin Jack is a seasonal limited edition beer. Like the brewery states on their website,  “a brew that brings together the classic flavours of a full bodied India Pale Ale and our Pumpkin Ale resulted in our newest IPA – Jumpin Jack ‘India Pumpkin Ale’.” This was a very unique combination of two, in my opinion, very different styles of beer.

The beer came in a 650ml bottle that I bought from my local LCBO, but like I stated above, is also available at the brewery. When I poured the beer into my branded glass, I noticed a dark copper colour with shades of ruby red. The beer was not very translucent, which to me had a cloudy appearance to it. The head of the beer was thick and full, which slowly settled to a thin head that left great lacing all the way down the glass.

Since Jumpin Jack is a combination of an IPA and Pumpkin ale, the aroma was very unique. At first, I could smell the pumpkin characteristic of the beer. I could instantly smell nutmeg and spice. The pumpkin notes were light on my nose and not very strong. The more powering aromas came from the IPA part of the beer. I could easily notice notes of citrus and lemon, which gave the beer an almost bitter smell to it.DSC02813

At first taste, you notice the full body flavours of this beer. The pumpkin notes stand out first. It is a real pumpkin taste, which is not overly sweet. The spice balance is perfect. It has hints of nutmeg and allspice with faint notes of cinnamon. The pumpkin slowly faded into the bitter portion of the beer.  I could taste bitter citrus and lemon. There was a light hint of grapefruit which gave it a very dry finish. The bitter was a great contrast to the lightly sweet pumpkin that the beer started out with. This was a very full bodied beer that was lightly carbonated. 

My overall impression of this beer is that it is a good balance of  different styles of beer. Jumpin Jack hit many areas of my taste palate, which made it very enjoyable. To me, this stood out from a lot of the pumpkin beers I have had this year due to the balance of sweet and bitter tastes. This is definitely a beer that I would recommend to any IPA and Pumpkin ale fan.

I give this beer an overall score of 39/50. Be sure to go and pick up a couple to try for yourself.  Shoot me a message or follow me on twitter (@_bottomlesspint) and tell me what you think.

Cheers!